How To Improve Joint Health - Tips & Tricks You’ll Wish You’d Knew Sooner

How To Improve Joint Health - Tips & Tricks You’ll Wish You’d Knew Sooner

Have you ever heard your grandma say “The weather must be changing ‘cause my joints hurt”? 

That was something I heard a lot as a kid, and every time it rained, my grandmother's joint predictions came true. 

I had strong joints at that age and could fall from trees without getting hurt, therefore I didn't grasp the concept of joints aching. 

Instead of being an indication of a declining body, I imagined my grandmother had this mystical capacity to sense changes in the weather. 

What I know now, but didn’t back then, is that changes in barometric pressure may cause tendons, muscles, and scar tissue to expand and contract. That leads to pain in joints affected by arthritis. Sudden temperature drops can also make the fluid inside the joints thicker. They become painful and stiff.

Poor grandma!

Our joints deteriorate and grow frailer as we age. Arthritis, for example, may develop, especially in women. Women are more likely than men to get arthritis, and we also have more severe pain. 

Gee, thanks but no thanks, Universe!

If you’re experiencing the first signs of painful joints, or just want to learn how to improve joint health, you’ve come to the right place.

Let’s talk about joints!

In order to establish what’s good for joint health, we should first talk about what joints are exactly. They are the parts of our bodies where two or more bones are joined together. 

Joints can be either rigid or movable. While the joints between the bones in our head are very much rigid, the ones in our wrists, knees, hips, and shoulders are movable. 

Joints have cartilage on the end of the bones where they come together. Cartilage is a flexible tissue that helps the bones glide over each other. It helps bones not to rub over each other, protecting them in the long run.

Arthritis is a condition that affects the joints and the cartilage. The most common type of arthritis, osteoarthritis, affects the cartilage that begins to break down, allowing the bones to rub against each other. It causes pain, swelling and reduced mobility in the affected joint. 

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system assaults and inflames the tissues of the joints. Inflammation of the joints causes pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function.  

And then there’s gout. This inflammatory disease is characterized by uric acid crystals forming in the joints. Uric acid can build up in a joint, forming needle-like crystals that produce sudden, acute pain, soreness, redness, warmth, and swelling. The big toe is the most usually affected by gout.

Let’s talk about joints

Stronger joints are just a lifestyle change away 

Our lifestyle impacts many aspects of our life, especially our health. When it comes to joint health, there is no exception.

If you want to maintain and prolong the strength of your joints, here are some steps you should follow every single day:

Be always on the move 

Having an active lifestyle can reduce the stiffness in your joints. You should try to avoid staying in the same position for long periods of time. When working, try to stand up from your desk every two hours and walk around for a couple of minutes. 

 Walking, swimming, cycling, strength training, and stretching are all low-impact exercises that can help your joints stay mobile and potentially help you lose weight. When practicing any type of exercise, you should take it slowly at first and use adequate safety equipment if necessary to safeguard your joints.

Keep your weight in check 

Every extra pound you gain along your life puts pressure on your joints. It’s as simple as that. 

You might not believe me, but you should trust the Arthritis Foundation. According to them, every extra pound you carry around feels like four pounds of pressure on your joints. 

The best thing you can do is to try to maintain a healthy weight. That way you’ll reduce as much as possible the risk of joint damage. 

A little exercise goes a long way 

Strong muscles and bones are your joint’s best friends! 

Include some strength training into your workouts, to keep those joints safe and mobile. Pay attention to core strengthening exercises for your abdomen, back, and chest. 

A strong core can prevent any balance problems, falls, or any other incidents that could result in a joint injury.

You can even do something as simple as walking or running.

Stronger joints are just a lifestyle change away

Foods for the joints 

We already know that what we eat affects our well-being, so there should be no surprise that food can improve or worsen our joint health. 

Take a pen and write this down. I’m about to tell you what to take for joint health and what to avoid.

Foods that reduce joint pain

  • Eat plenty of Omega-3-rich fish like salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel, or herrings. The polyunsaturated fatty acids contained by these fish can help reduce inflammation, improve brain function, and lower the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and other illnesses.
  • You can also take your Omega 3 intake from nuts and seeds. Eat small amounts of walnuts, almonds, flax seeds, chia seeds, or pine nuts daily. They can help reduce inflammation in the joints and connective tissue.
  • Eat veggies like broccoli, spinach, kale, cauliflower, or Brussels sprout. They are full of antioxidants that can help maintain healthy joints. 
  • Enjoy some colorful fruits. They’re not only delicious, but they can also reduce inflammation in the body and reduce joint pain. Choose blueberries, apples, pineapples, cherries, or oranges.
  • Another great source of Omega 3 is olive oil. Buy the extra virgin type and use it both for cooking and salad dressings.
  • You can even indulge in a bit of dark chocolate from time to time, as it has anti-inflammatory properties. Chocolate with a higher percentage of cocoa has a stronger anti-inflammatory impact.

Arthritis trigger foods 

  • You’ll want to stay away from wheat foods like pasta, bagels, bread, as they contain gluten, a protein that irritates joints and causes arthritis pains to flare up.
  • Butter and margarine are filled with advanced glycation end products. These substances can cause stiffness and inflammation in the body, so it’s best to avoid them.
  • Whenever you feel like eating a hamburger, think again. Burgers also contain advanced glycation end products, but that’s only part of the problem. They might also encourage the growth of a type of gut bacteria that can attack the cartilage of your joints.
  • You might want to take care of what you drink too. Sugary drinks that contain fructose are also bad for your joints. Switch to sparkling water or unsweetened ice tea instead.

Foods for the joints

There you have it! It’s not as hard to treat your joints with kindness, and in return, they will ache less when you're older. Follow all these tips on how to improve joint health and when you’ll reach my grandma’s age you won’t be able to predict when rain is coming. 

It might not be as mystical for the grandkids, but it will be a whole lot less painful for you!


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Have you ever heard your grandma say “The weather must be changing ‘cause my joints hurt”?  That was something I heard a lot as a kid, and every time it rained, my grandmother's joint predictions came true.  I had strong joints at that age and could fall from trees without getting hurt, therefore I didn't grasp the concept of joints aching.  Instead of being an indication of a declining body, I imagined my grandmother had this mystical capacity to sense changes in the weather.  What I know now, but didn’t back then, is that changes in barometric pressure may cause tendons, muscles, and scar tissue to expand and contract. That leads to pain in joints affected by arthritis. Sudden temperature drops can also make the fluid inside the joints thicker. They become painful and stiff. Poor grandma! Our joints deteriorate and grow frailer as we age. Arthritis, for example, may develop, especially in women. Women are more likely than men to get arthritis, and we also have more severe pain.  Gee, thanks but no thanks, Universe! If you’re experiencing the first signs of painful joints, or just want to learn how to improve joint health, you’ve come to the right place. Let’s talk about joints! In order to establish what’s good for joint health, we should first talk about what joints are exactly. They are the parts of our bodies where two or more bones are joined together.  Joints can be either rigid or movable. While the joints between the bones in our head are very much rigid, the ones in our wrists, knees, hips, and shoulders are movable.  Joints have cartilage on the end of the bones where they come together. Cartilage is a flexible tissue that helps the bones glide over each other. It helps bones not to rub over each other, protecting them in the long run. Arthritis is a condition that affects the joints and the cartilage. The most common type of arthritis, osteoarthritis, affects the cartilage that begins to break down, allowing the bones to rub against each other. It causes pain, swelling and reduced mobility in the affected joint.  Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system assaults and inflames the tissues of the joints. Inflammation of the joints causes pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function.   And then there’s gout. This inflammatory disease is characterized by uric acid crystals forming in the joints. Uric acid can build up in a joint, forming needle-like crystals that produce sudden, acute pain, soreness, redness, warmth, and swelling. The big toe is the most usually affected by gout. Stronger joints are just a lifestyle change away  Our lifestyle impacts many aspects of our life, especially our health. When it comes to joint health, there is no exception. If you want to maintain and prolong the strength of your joints, here are some steps you should follow every single day: Be always on the move  Having an active lifestyle can reduce the stiffness in your joints. You should try to avoid staying in the same position for long periods of time. When working, try to stand up from your desk every two hours and walk around for a couple of minutes.   Walking, swimming, cycling, strength training, and stretching are all low-impact exercises that can help your joints stay mobile and potentially help you lose weight. When practicing any type of exercise, you should take it slowly at first and use adequate safety equipment if necessary to safeguard your joints. Keep your weight in check  Every extra pound you gain along your life puts pressure on your joints. It’s as simple as that.  You might not believe me, but you should trust the Arthritis Foundation. According to them, every extra pound you carry around feels like four pounds of pressure on your joints.  The best thing you can do is to try to maintain a healthy weight. That way you’ll reduce as much as possible the risk of joint damage.  A little exercise goes a long way  Strong muscles and bones are your joint’s best friends!  Include some strength training into your workouts, to keep those joints safe and mobile. Pay attention to core strengthening exercises for your abdomen, back, and chest.  A strong core can prevent any balance problems, falls, or any other incidents that could result in a joint injury. You can even do something as simple as walking or running. Foods for the joints  We already know that what we eat affects our well-being, so there should be no surprise that food can improve or worsen our joint health.  Take a pen and write this down. I’m about to tell you what to take for joint health and what to avoid. Foods that reduce joint pain Eat plenty of Omega-3-rich fish like salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel, or herrings. The polyunsaturated fatty acids contained by these fish can help reduce inflammation, improve brain function, and lower the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and other illnesses. You can also take your Omega 3 intake from nuts and seeds. Eat small amounts of walnuts, almonds, flax seeds, chia seeds, or pine nuts daily. They can help reduce inflammation in the joints and connective tissue. Eat veggies like broccoli, spinach, kale, cauliflower, or Brussels sprout. They are full of antioxidants that can help maintain healthy joints.  Enjoy some colorful fruits. They’re not only delicious, but they can also reduce inflammation in the body and reduce joint pain. Choose blueberries, apples, pineapples, cherries, or oranges. Another great source of Omega 3 is olive oil. Buy the extra virgin type and use it both for cooking and salad dressings. You can even indulge in a bit of dark chocolate from time to time, as it has anti-inflammatory properties. Chocolate with a higher percentage of cocoa has a stronger anti-inflammatory impact. Arthritis trigger foods  You’ll want to stay away from wheat foods like pasta, bagels, bread, as they contain gluten, a protein that irritates joints and causes arthritis pains to flare up. Butter and margarine are filled with advanced glycation end products. These substances can cause stiffness and inflammation in the body, so it’s best to avoid them. Whenever you feel like eating a hamburger, think again. Burgers also contain advanced glycation end products, but that’s only part of the problem. They might also encourage the growth of a type of gut bacteria that can attack the cartilage of your joints. You might want to take care of what you drink too. Sugary drinks that contain fructose are also bad for your joints. Switch to sparkling water or unsweetened ice tea instead. There you have it! It’s not as hard to treat your joints with kindness, and in return, they will ache less when you're older. Follow all these tips on how to improve joint health and when you’ll reach my grandma’s age you won’t be able to predict when rain is coming.  It might not be as mystical for the grandkids, but it will be a whole lot less painful for you!
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Have you ever heard your grandma say “The weather must be changing ‘cause my joints hurt”?  That was something I heard a lot as a kid, and every time it rained, my grandmother's joint predictions came true.  I had strong joints at that age and could fall from trees without getting hurt, therefore I didn't grasp the concept of joints aching.  Instead of being an indication of a declining body, I imagined my grandmother had this mystical capacity to sense changes in the weather.  What I know now, but didn’t back then, is that changes in barometric pressure may cause tendons, muscles, and scar tissue to expand and contract. That leads to pain in joints affected by arthritis. Sudden temperature drops can also make the fluid inside the joints thicker. They become painful and stiff. Poor grandma! Our joints deteriorate and grow frailer as we age. Arthritis, for example, may develop, especially in women. Women are more likely than men to get arthritis, and we also have more severe pain.  Gee, thanks but no thanks, Universe! If you’re experiencing the first signs of painful joints, or just want to learn how to improve joint health, you’ve come to the right place. Let’s talk about joints! In order to establish what’s good for joint health, we should first talk about what joints are exactly. They are the parts of our bodies where two or more bones are joined together.  Joints can be either rigid or movable. While the joints between the bones in our head are very much rigid, the ones in our wrists, knees, hips, and shoulders are movable.  Joints have cartilage on the end of the bones where they come together. Cartilage is a flexible tissue that helps the bones glide over each other. It helps bones not to rub over each other, protecting them in the long run. Arthritis is a condition that affects the joints and the cartilage. The most common type of arthritis, osteoarthritis, affects the cartilage that begins to break down, allowing the bones to rub against each other. It causes pain, swelling and reduced mobility in the affected joint.  Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system assaults and inflames the tissues of the joints. Inflammation of the joints causes pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function.   And then there’s gout. This inflammatory disease is characterized by uric acid crystals forming in the joints. Uric acid can build up in a joint, forming needle-like crystals that produce sudden, acute pain, soreness, redness, warmth, and swelling. The big toe is the most usually affected by gout. Stronger joints are just a lifestyle change away  Our lifestyle impacts many aspects of our life, especially our health. When it comes to joint health, there is no exception. If you want to maintain and prolong the strength of your joints, here are some steps you should follow every single day: Be always on the move  Having an active lifestyle can reduce the stiffness in your joints. You should try to avoid staying in the same position for long periods of time. When working, try to stand up from your desk every two hours and walk around for a couple of minutes.   Walking, swimming, cycling, strength training, and stretching are all low-impact exercises that can help your joints stay mobile and potentially help you lose weight. When practicing any type of exercise, you should take it slowly at first and use adequate safety equipment if necessary to safeguard your joints. Keep your weight in check  Every extra pound you gain along your life puts pressure on your joints. It’s as simple as that.  You might not believe me, but you should trust the Arthritis Foundation. According to them, every extra pound you carry around feels like four pounds of pressure on your joints.  The best thing you can do is to try to maintain a healthy weight. That way you’ll reduce as much as possible the risk of joint damage.  A little exercise goes a long way  Strong muscles and bones are your joint’s best friends!  Include some strength training into your workouts, to keep those joints safe and mobile. Pay attention to core strengthening exercises for your abdomen, back, and chest.  A strong core can prevent any balance problems, falls, or any other incidents that could result in a joint injury. You can even do something as simple as walking or running. Foods for the joints  We already know that what we eat affects our well-being, so there should be no surprise that food can improve or worsen our joint health.  Take a pen and write this down. I’m about to tell you what to take for joint health and what to avoid. Foods that reduce joint pain Eat plenty of Omega-3-rich fish like salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel, or herrings. The polyunsaturated fatty acids contained by these fish can help reduce inflammation, improve brain function, and lower the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and other illnesses. You can also take your Omega 3 intake from nuts and seeds. Eat small amounts of walnuts, almonds, flax seeds, chia seeds, or pine nuts daily. They can help reduce inflammation in the joints and connective tissue. Eat veggies like broccoli, spinach, kale, cauliflower, or Brussels sprout. They are full of antioxidants that can help maintain healthy joints.  Enjoy some colorful fruits. They’re not only delicious, but they can also reduce inflammation in the body and reduce joint pain. Choose blueberries, apples, pineapples, cherries, or oranges. Another great source of Omega 3 is olive oil. Buy the extra virgin type and use it both for cooking and salad dressings. You can even indulge in a bit of dark chocolate from time to time, as it has anti-inflammatory properties. Chocolate with a higher percentage of cocoa has a stronger anti-inflammatory impact. Arthritis trigger foods  You’ll want to stay away from wheat foods like pasta, bagels, bread, as they contain gluten, a protein that irritates joints and causes arthritis pains to flare up. Butter and margarine are filled with advanced glycation end products. These substances can cause stiffness and inflammation in the body, so it’s best to avoid them. Whenever you feel like eating a hamburger, think again. Burgers also contain advanced glycation end products, but that’s only part of the problem. They might also encourage the growth of a type of gut bacteria that can attack the cartilage of your joints. You might want to take care of what you drink too. Sugary drinks that contain fructose are also bad for your joints. Switch to sparkling water or unsweetened ice tea instead. There you have it! It’s not as hard to treat your joints with kindness, and in return, they will ache less when you're older. Follow all these tips on how to improve joint health and when you’ll reach my grandma’s age you won’t be able to predict when rain is coming.  It might not be as mystical for the grandkids, but it will be a whole lot less painful for you!
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Have you ever heard your grandma say “The weather must be changing ‘cause my joints hurt”?  That was something I heard a lot as a kid, and every time it rained, my grandmother's joint predictions came true.  I had strong joints at that age and could fall from trees without getting hurt, therefore I didn't grasp the concept of joints aching.  Instead of being an indication of a declining body, I imagined my grandmother had this mystical capacity to sense changes in the weather.  What I know now, but didn’t back then, is that changes in barometric pressure may cause tendons, muscles, and scar tissue to expand and contract. That leads to pain in joints affected by arthritis. Sudden temperature drops can also make the fluid inside the joints thicker. They become painful and stiff. Poor grandma! Our joints deteriorate and grow frailer as we age. Arthritis, for example, may develop, especially in women. Women are more likely than men to get arthritis, and we also have more severe pain.  Gee, thanks but no thanks, Universe! If you’re experiencing the first signs of painful joints, or just want to learn how to improve joint health, you’ve come to the right place. Let’s talk about joints! In order to establish what’s good for joint health, we should first talk about what joints are exactly. They are the parts of our bodies where two or more bones are joined together.  Joints can be either rigid or movable. While the joints between the bones in our head are very much rigid, the ones in our wrists, knees, hips, and shoulders are movable.  Joints have cartilage on the end of the bones where they come together. Cartilage is a flexible tissue that helps the bones glide over each other. It helps bones not to rub over each other, protecting them in the long run. Arthritis is a condition that affects the joints and the cartilage. The most common type of arthritis, osteoarthritis, affects the cartilage that begins to break down, allowing the bones to rub against each other. It causes pain, swelling and reduced mobility in the affected joint.  Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system assaults and inflames the tissues of the joints. Inflammation of the joints causes pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function.   And then there’s gout. This inflammatory disease is characterized by uric acid crystals forming in the joints. Uric acid can build up in a joint, forming needle-like crystals that produce sudden, acute pain, soreness, redness, warmth, and swelling. The big toe is the most usually affected by gout. Stronger joints are just a lifestyle change away  Our lifestyle impacts many aspects of our life, especially our health. When it comes to joint health, there is no exception. If you want to maintain and prolong the strength of your joints, here are some steps you should follow every single day: Be always on the move  Having an active lifestyle can reduce the stiffness in your joints. You should try to avoid staying in the same position for long periods of time. When working, try to stand up from your desk every two hours and walk around for a couple of minutes.   Walking, swimming, cycling, strength training, and stretching are all low-impact exercises that can help your joints stay mobile and potentially help you lose weight. When practicing any type of exercise, you should take it slowly at first and use adequate safety equipment if necessary to safeguard your joints. Keep your weight in check  Every extra pound you gain along your life puts pressure on your joints. It’s as simple as that.  You might not believe me, but you should trust the Arthritis Foundation. According to them, every extra pound you carry around feels like four pounds of pressure on your joints.  The best thing you can do is to try to maintain a healthy weight. That way you’ll reduce as much as possible the risk of joint damage.  A little exercise goes a long way  Strong muscles and bones are your joint’s best friends!  Include some strength training into your workouts, to keep those joints safe and mobile. Pay attention to core strengthening exercises for your abdomen, back, and chest.  A strong core can prevent any balance problems, falls, or any other incidents that could result in a joint injury. You can even do something as simple as walking or running. Foods for the joints  We already know that what we eat affects our well-being, so there should be no surprise that food can improve or worsen our joint health.  Take a pen and write this down. I’m about to tell you what to take for joint health and what to avoid. Foods that reduce joint pain Eat plenty of Omega-3-rich fish like salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel, or herrings. The polyunsaturated fatty acids contained by these fish can help reduce inflammation, improve brain function, and lower the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and other illnesses. You can also take your Omega 3 intake from nuts and seeds. Eat small amounts of walnuts, almonds, flax seeds, chia seeds, or pine nuts daily. They can help reduce inflammation in the joints and connective tissue. Eat veggies like broccoli, spinach, kale, cauliflower, or Brussels sprout. They are full of antioxidants that can help maintain healthy joints.  Enjoy some colorful fruits. They’re not only delicious, but they can also reduce inflammation in the body and reduce joint pain. Choose blueberries, apples, pineapples, cherries, or oranges. Another great source of Omega 3 is olive oil. Buy the extra virgin type and use it both for cooking and salad dressings. You can even indulge in a bit of dark chocolate from time to time, as it has anti-inflammatory properties. Chocolate with a higher percentage of cocoa has a stronger anti-inflammatory impact. Arthritis trigger foods  You’ll want to stay away from wheat foods like pasta, bagels, bread, as they contain gluten, a protein that irritates joints and causes arthritis pains to flare up. Butter and margarine are filled with advanced glycation end products. These substances can cause stiffness and inflammation in the body, so it’s best to avoid them. Whenever you feel like eating a hamburger, think again. Burgers also contain advanced glycation end products, but that’s only part of the problem. They might also encourage the growth of a type of gut bacteria that can attack the cartilage of your joints. You might want to take care of what you drink too. Sugary drinks that contain fructose are also bad for your joints. Switch to sparkling water or unsweetened ice tea instead. There you have it! It’s not as hard to treat your joints with kindness, and in return, they will ache less when you're older. Follow all these tips on how to improve joint health and when you’ll reach my grandma’s age you won’t be able to predict when rain is coming.  It might not be as mystical for the grandkids, but it will be a whole lot less painful for you!
Read More