Is Organic Food Healthier Than Conventional Food?

Is Organic Food Healthier Than Conventional Food?

Organic food...you’ve seen it in the grocery store, you heard about it, everyone is either against it or all for it; one thing is certain - everyone seems to have an opinion on it. Yet...you’re not sure what to think about it and don’t want to claim anything without prior research. Smart decision! Is organic food healthier than conventional food? In this blog, you’ll read all about organic food and how it matches up against non-organic food.

What does “organic” mean?

Let’s start with something that might seem a bit shocking to you. All foods are organic. “What?” you might think, “you’re bonkers.” but let us explain. 

For sure, it might be a matter of semantics, but the definition of “organic” is that it’s a compound based on carbon: meaning that all food we eat is technically organic. 

However, we all know this is not what you meant when you were wondering about organic food. So, let us try and define it a bit differently.

This is what the USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) has to say on the matter: “Organic is a labeling term that indicates that the food or other agricultural product has been produced through approved methods. 

These methods integrate cultural, biological, and mechanical practices that foster cycling of resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity. Synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge, irradiation, and genetic engineering may not be used.”

So, to put it simply, organic food is food that was grown without the use of pesticides or any other chemical that is not allowed. We’d also add that having a real organic farm requires certification. Organic farms have to follow strict rules and standards in order to get the organic certificate, so always check for those when buying organic food.

Is organic food better than conventional foods?

organic vs non organic food study

So this is the real question. Is organic food healthier, more nutritious, does it have better long-term effects on our bodies? If yes, why? If no, why not?

So, let’s cross out each of those questions, one by one.

Is organic food healthier?

Since we now know the official definition of organic food, we know that those types of food are not treated with plenty of pesticides, or treated chemically. 

According to research, being exposed to very high levels of pesticides and herbicides can lead to a higher risk of cancer. However, the amount of pesticides used in growing fruits, vegetables, or meat, are not nearly as high. Even more so, there seems to be no evidence that would show that long exposure to pesticides in food causes a higher risk of cancer.

If you feel uneasy about farms using lots of pesticides and herbicides, then buying and eating organic food makes a lot more sense.

Is organic food more nutritious than non organic food?

According to all the research being done so far, there is no proof that organic food is more nutritious than conventional food. What this means is that, if you were to compare two apples - one organic, and the other non organic, they would have the same nutritional value.

This, however, doesn’t make organic and non organic food the same. Organic food is not treated chemically, and is not exposed to pesticides or antibiotics (sometimes used with cattle) in the same manner conventional food is - so if you want to minimize your exposure to those things as well, organic food is the way to go for you.

Is organic food better for the environment?

As with all the previous questions, this one is also not that easy to give a straight yes or no question. While growing food on the farm takes up more space creating higher emissions, the overall treatment of soil is better than when it’s treated with chemicals.

Organic systems used in organic farming use less energy, use less fertilizer and much less herbicid, have more fertile soil, and are also more profitable.

The classification of organic food

 

is organic food better for the environment

According to USDA, there are 4 different organic labels:

“100 Percent Organic”

  • Used to label any product that contains 100 percent organic ingredients (excluding salt and water, which are considered natural)
  • Most raw, unprocessed or minimally processed farm crops can be labeled “100 percent organic”
    • PDP: May include USDA organic seal and/or 100 percent organic claim
    • IP: Identify organic ingredients (e.g., organic dill) or via asterisk or other mark

“Organic”

  • Any product that contains a minimum of 95 percent organic ingredients (excluding salt and water)
  • Up to 5 percent of ingredients may be nonorganic agricultural products and/or nonagricultural products on the National List (non organic agricultural products and several nonagricultural p roducts on the National List may only be used if they are not commercially available as organic)
    • PDP: May include USDA organic seal and/or organic claim
    • IP: Identify organic ingredients (e.g., organic dill) or via asterisk or other mark

“Made with Organic ______”

  • Product contains at least 70 percent organically produced ingredients (excluding salt and water), with a number of detailed constraints regarding ingredients that comprise the inorganic portion
    • PDP: May state “made with organic (insert up to three ingredients or ingredient categories)”; must not include USDA organic seal anywhere, represent finished product as organic, or state “made with organic ingredients”
    • IP: Identify organic ingredients (e.g., organic dill) or via asterisk or other mark

Specific Organic Ingredient Listings

  • Specific organic ingredients may be listed in the ingredient statement of products containing less than 70 percent organic contents—for example, “Ingredients: water, barley, beans, organic tomatoes, salt.”
    • PDP: Must not include USDA organic seal anywhere or the word “organic”
    • IP: May only list certified organic ingredients as organic in the ingredient list and the percentage of organic ingredients; remaining ingredients not required to follow the USDA organic regulations.”

However, also keep in mind that:

“Producers who market less than $5,000 worth of organic products annually are not required to apply for organic certification, with the following caveats:

  • Must comply with the organic production and handling requirements of the regulations, including recordkeeping (for at least 3 years).
  • Products from such noncertified operations cannot be used as organic ingredients in processed products produced by another operation nor may they display the USDA certified organic seal. “

So, next time you shop for organic products, keep in mind the label class, and decide what you feel comfortable with.

The downside of organic food

This seems to be one of the easiest ones to answer: the price.

It seems like the price of organic food is a lot higher than conventional foods. 

It may seem ok to you to pay more in order to incorporate ingredients that were less exposed to pesticides and chemicals, as well as non-GMO, in which case we say: go for it! 

We’d also like to add that profit margins for organic farming are larger than for non-organic farming. 

All we’re saying is that you should be careful, and know your facts. Educate yourself when reading about everything, and know who stands behind the information you're reading about; in the world of online information flowing around effortlessly, managed by AI, it can be easy to surround yourself with a stream of “facts” that confirm your pre-research thoughts. 

This means that, oftentimes, you can find information both for organic farming (sometimes supported by organic farming companies) and against it (sometimes supported by conventional farming companies) - so it’s best to look for research done by independent researchers.

Easy-to-follow organic and non-organic ingredients to buy

Is organic food healthier than conventional food

If you don’t have enough money to go full organic, we’re here to help!

There are certain foods that require more pesticides to grow, in which case you should consider getting those organic. Each year, the Environmental Working Group (EWG), a nonprofit organization, writes a Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce that lists fruits and vegetables with the highest and lowest pesticide residues.

Buy organic:

According to the “dirty dozen” list, these are the fruits and vegetables you should buy organic:

  • Strawberries
  • Spinach
  • Kale, collard and mustard greens
  • Nectarines
  • Apples
  • Grapes
  • Cherries
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Bell and hot Peppers
  • Celery
  • Tomatoes

These fruits and vegetables are likely to be contaminated with pesticide residues.

Don’t have to buy organic:

EWG’s list of 15 clean foods lists these as foods you don’t have to buy organic:

  • Avocados
  • Sweet corn
  • Pineapple
  • Onions
  • Papaya
  • Sweet peas (frozen)
  • Eggplant
  • Asparagus
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Kiwi
  • Cauliflower
  • Mushrooms
  • Honeydew melon
  • Cantaloupe

These fruits and vegetables are less likely to be contaminated with pesticide residues.

Conclusion: Know your ingredients

The best advice anyone can give you when shopping and wanting to eat healthy and clean is to KNOW YOUR INGREDIENTS. 

We know it might be difficult or overwhelming to read and learn about all the different ingredients, additives, and nutritional values - but if you really want to know what you’re consuming….this might be the only way.

Make yourself familiar with nutritional tables, and always look for them on every box or a bag. If you want organic, look for labels, read the fine print. Always read the fine print.

And in the meantime? Read, learn, do your research. If you’re reading this, that means you’re already on the right track.

 


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Organic food...you’ve seen it in the grocery store, you heard about it, everyone is either against it or all for it; one thing is certain - everyone seems to have an opinion on it. Yet...you’re not sure what to think about it and don’t want to claim anything without prior research. Smart decision! Is organic food healthier than conventional food? In this blog, you’ll read all about organic food and how it matches up against non-organic food. What does “organic” mean? Let’s start with something that might seem a bit shocking to you. All foods are organic. “What?” you might think, “you’re bonkers.” but let us explain.  For sure, it might be a matter of semantics, but the definition of “organic” is that it’s a compound based on carbon: meaning that all food we eat is technically organic.  However, we all know this is not what you meant when you were wondering about organic food. So, let us try and define it a bit differently. This is what the USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) has to say on the matter: “Organic is a labeling term that indicates that the food or other agricultural product has been produced through approved methods.  These methods integrate cultural, biological, and mechanical practices that foster cycling of resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity. Synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge, irradiation, and genetic engineering may not be used.” So, to put it simply, organic food is food that was grown without the use of pesticides or any other chemical that is not allowed. We’d also add that having a real organic farm requires certification. Organic farms have to follow strict rules and standards in order to get the organic certificate, so always check for those when buying organic food. Is organic food better than conventional foods? So this is the real question. Is organic food healthier, more nutritious, does it have better long-term effects on our bodies? If yes, why? If no, why not? So, let’s cross out each of those questions, one by one. Is organic food healthier? Since we now know the official definition of organic food, we know that those types of food are not treated with plenty of pesticides, or treated chemically.  According to research, being exposed to very high levels of pesticides and herbicides can lead to a higher risk of cancer. However, the amount of pesticides used in growing fruits, vegetables, or meat, are not nearly as high. Even more so, there seems to be no evidence that would show that long exposure to pesticides in food causes a higher risk of cancer. If you feel uneasy about farms using lots of pesticides and herbicides, then buying and eating organic food makes a lot more sense. Is organic food more nutritious than non organic food? According to all the research being done so far, there is no proof that organic food is more nutritious than conventional food. What this means is that, if you were to compare two apples - one organic, and the other non organic, they would have the same nutritional value. This, however, doesn’t make organic and non organic food the same. Organic food is not treated chemically, and is not exposed to pesticides or antibiotics (sometimes used with cattle) in the same manner conventional food is - so if you want to minimize your exposure to those things as well, organic food is the way to go for you. Is organic food better for the environment? As with all the previous questions, this one is also not that easy to give a straight yes or no question. While growing food on the farm takes up more space creating higher emissions, the overall treatment of soil is better than when it’s treated with chemicals. Organic systems used in organic farming use less energy, use less fertilizer and much less herbicid, have more fertile soil, and are also more profitable. The classification of organic food   According to USDA, there are 4 different organic labels: “100 Percent Organic” Used to label any product that contains 100 percent organic ingredients (excluding salt and water, which are considered natural) Most raw, unprocessed or minimally processed farm crops can be labeled “100 percent organic” PDP: May include USDA organic seal and/or 100 percent organic claim IP: Identify organic ingredients (e.g., organic dill) or via asterisk or other mark “Organic” Any product that contains a minimum of 95 percent organic ingredients (excluding salt and water) Up to 5 percent of ingredients may be nonorganic agricultural products and/or nonagricultural products on the National List (non organic agricultural products and several nonagricultural p roducts on the National List may only be used if they are not commercially available as organic) PDP: May include USDA organic seal and/or organic claim IP: Identify organic ingredients (e.g., organic dill) or via asterisk or other mark “Made with Organic ______” Product contains at least 70 percent organically produced ingredients (excluding salt and water), with a number of detailed constraints regarding ingredients that comprise the inorganic portion PDP: May state “made with organic (insert up to three ingredients or ingredient categories)”; must not include USDA organic seal anywhere, represent finished product as organic, or state “made with organic ingredients” IP: Identify organic ingredients (e.g., organic dill) or via asterisk or other mark Specific Organic Ingredient Listings Specific organic ingredients may be listed in the ingredient statement of products containing less than 70 percent organic contents—for example, “Ingredients: water, barley, beans, organic tomatoes, salt.” PDP: Must not include USDA organic seal anywhere or the word “organic” IP: May only list certified organic ingredients as organic in the ingredient list and the percentage of organic ingredients; remaining ingredients not required to follow the USDA organic regulations.” However, also keep in mind that: “Producers who market less than $5,000 worth of organic products annually are not required to apply for organic certification, with the following caveats: Must comply with the organic production and handling requirements of the regulations, including recordkeeping (for at least 3 years). Products from such noncertified operations cannot be used as organic ingredients in processed products produced by another operation nor may they display the USDA certified organic seal. “ So, next time you shop for organic products, keep in mind the label class, and decide what you feel comfortable with. The downside of organic food This seems to be one of the easiest ones to answer: the price. It seems like the price of organic food is a lot higher than conventional foods.  It may seem ok to you to pay more in order to incorporate ingredients that were less exposed to pesticides and chemicals, as well as non-GMO, in which case we say: go for it!  We’d also like to add that profit margins for organic farming are larger than for non-organic farming.  All we’re saying is that you should be careful, and know your facts. Educate yourself when reading about everything, and know who stands behind the information you're reading about; in the world of online information flowing around effortlessly, managed by AI, it can be easy to surround yourself with a stream of “facts” that confirm your pre-research thoughts.  This means that, oftentimes, you can find information both for organic farming (sometimes supported by organic farming companies) and against it (sometimes supported by conventional farming companies) - so it’s best to look for research done by independent researchers. Easy-to-follow organic and non-organic ingredients to buy If you don’t have enough money to go full organic, we’re here to help! There are certain foods that require more pesticides to grow, in which case you should consider getting those organic. Each year, the Environmental Working Group (EWG), a nonprofit organization, writes a Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce that lists fruits and vegetables with the highest and lowest pesticide residues. Buy organic: According to the “dirty dozen” list, these are the fruits and vegetables you should buy organic: Strawberries Spinach Kale, collard and mustard greens Nectarines Apples Grapes Cherries Peaches Pears Bell and hot Peppers Celery Tomatoes These fruits and vegetables are likely to be contaminated with pesticide residues. Don’t have to buy organic: EWG’s list of 15 clean foods lists these as foods you don’t have to buy organic: Avocados Sweet corn Pineapple Onions Papaya Sweet peas (frozen) Eggplant Asparagus Broccoli Cabbage Kiwi Cauliflower Mushrooms Honeydew melon Cantaloupe These fruits and vegetables are less likely to be contaminated with pesticide residues. Conclusion: Know your ingredients The best advice anyone can give you when shopping and wanting to eat healthy and clean is to KNOW YOUR INGREDIENTS.  We know it might be difficult or overwhelming to read and learn about all the different ingredients, additives, and nutritional values - but if you really want to know what you’re consuming….this might be the only way. Make yourself familiar with nutritional tables, and always look for them on every box or a bag. If you want organic, look for labels, read the fine print. Always read the fine print. And in the meantime? Read, learn, do your research. If you’re reading this, that means you’re already on the right track.  
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This is what the USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) has to say on the matter: “Organic is a labeling term that indicates that the food or other agricultural product has been produced through approved methods.  These methods integrate cultural, biological, and mechanical practices that foster cycling of resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity. Synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge, irradiation, and genetic engineering may not be used.” So, to put it simply, organic food is food that was grown without the use of pesticides or any other chemical that is not allowed. We’d also add that having a real organic farm requires certification. Organic farms have to follow strict rules and standards in order to get the organic certificate, so always check for those when buying organic food. Is organic food better than conventional foods? So this is the real question. Is organic food healthier, more nutritious, does it have better long-term effects on our bodies? If yes, why? If no, why not? So, let’s cross out each of those questions, one by one. Is organic food healthier? Since we now know the official definition of organic food, we know that those types of food are not treated with plenty of pesticides, or treated chemically.  According to research, being exposed to very high levels of pesticides and herbicides can lead to a higher risk of cancer. However, the amount of pesticides used in growing fruits, vegetables, or meat, are not nearly as high. Even more so, there seems to be no evidence that would show that long exposure to pesticides in food causes a higher risk of cancer. If you feel uneasy about farms using lots of pesticides and herbicides, then buying and eating organic food makes a lot more sense. Is organic food more nutritious than non organic food? According to all the research being done so far, there is no proof that organic food is more nutritious than conventional food. What this means is that, if you were to compare two apples - one organic, and the other non organic, they would have the same nutritional value. This, however, doesn’t make organic and non organic food the same. Organic food is not treated chemically, and is not exposed to pesticides or antibiotics (sometimes used with cattle) in the same manner conventional food is - so if you want to minimize your exposure to those things as well, organic food is the way to go for you. Is organic food better for the environment? As with all the previous questions, this one is also not that easy to give a straight yes or no question. While growing food on the farm takes up more space creating higher emissions, the overall treatment of soil is better than when it’s treated with chemicals. Organic systems used in organic farming use less energy, use less fertilizer and much less herbicid, have more fertile soil, and are also more profitable. The classification of organic food   According to USDA, there are 4 different organic labels: “100 Percent Organic” Used to label any product that contains 100 percent organic ingredients (excluding salt and water, which are considered natural) Most raw, unprocessed or minimally processed farm crops can be labeled “100 percent organic” PDP: May include USDA organic seal and/or 100 percent organic claim IP: Identify organic ingredients (e.g., organic dill) or via asterisk or other mark “Organic” Any product that contains a minimum of 95 percent organic ingredients (excluding salt and water) Up to 5 percent of ingredients may be nonorganic agricultural products and/or nonagricultural products on the National List (non organic agricultural products and several nonagricultural p roducts on the National List may only be used if they are not commercially available as organic) PDP: May include USDA organic seal and/or organic claim IP: Identify organic ingredients (e.g., organic dill) or via asterisk or other mark “Made with Organic ______” Product contains at least 70 percent organically produced ingredients (excluding salt and water), with a number of detailed constraints regarding ingredients that comprise the inorganic portion PDP: May state “made with organic (insert up to three ingredients or ingredient categories)”; must not include USDA organic seal anywhere, represent finished product as organic, or state “made with organic ingredients” IP: Identify organic ingredients (e.g., organic dill) or via asterisk or other mark Specific Organic Ingredient Listings Specific organic ingredients may be listed in the ingredient statement of products containing less than 70 percent organic contents—for example, “Ingredients: water, barley, beans, organic tomatoes, salt.” PDP: Must not include USDA organic seal anywhere or the word “organic” IP: May only list certified organic ingredients as organic in the ingredient list and the percentage of organic ingredients; remaining ingredients not required to follow the USDA organic regulations.” However, also keep in mind that: “Producers who market less than $5,000 worth of organic products annually are not required to apply for organic certification, with the following caveats: Must comply with the organic production and handling requirements of the regulations, including recordkeeping (for at least 3 years). Products from such noncertified operations cannot be used as organic ingredients in processed products produced by another operation nor may they display the USDA certified organic seal. “ So, next time you shop for organic products, keep in mind the label class, and decide what you feel comfortable with. The downside of organic food This seems to be one of the easiest ones to answer: the price. It seems like the price of organic food is a lot higher than conventional foods.  It may seem ok to you to pay more in order to incorporate ingredients that were less exposed to pesticides and chemicals, as well as non-GMO, in which case we say: go for it!  We’d also like to add that profit margins for organic farming are larger than for non-organic farming.  All we’re saying is that you should be careful, and know your facts. Educate yourself when reading about everything, and know who stands behind the information you're reading about; in the world of online information flowing around effortlessly, managed by AI, it can be easy to surround yourself with a stream of “facts” that confirm your pre-research thoughts.  This means that, oftentimes, you can find information both for organic farming (sometimes supported by organic farming companies) and against it (sometimes supported by conventional farming companies) - so it’s best to look for research done by independent researchers. Easy-to-follow organic and non-organic ingredients to buy If you don’t have enough money to go full organic, we’re here to help! There are certain foods that require more pesticides to grow, in which case you should consider getting those organic. Each year, the Environmental Working Group (EWG), a nonprofit organization, writes a Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce that lists fruits and vegetables with the highest and lowest pesticide residues. Buy organic: According to the “dirty dozen” list, these are the fruits and vegetables you should buy organic: Strawberries Spinach Kale, collard and mustard greens Nectarines Apples Grapes Cherries Peaches Pears Bell and hot Peppers Celery Tomatoes These fruits and vegetables are likely to be contaminated with pesticide residues. Don’t have to buy organic: EWG’s list of 15 clean foods lists these as foods you don’t have to buy organic: Avocados Sweet corn Pineapple Onions Papaya Sweet peas (frozen) Eggplant Asparagus Broccoli Cabbage Kiwi Cauliflower Mushrooms Honeydew melon Cantaloupe These fruits and vegetables are less likely to be contaminated with pesticide residues. Conclusion: Know your ingredients The best advice anyone can give you when shopping and wanting to eat healthy and clean is to KNOW YOUR INGREDIENTS.  We know it might be difficult or overwhelming to read and learn about all the different ingredients, additives, and nutritional values - but if you really want to know what you’re consuming….this might be the only way. Make yourself familiar with nutritional tables, and always look for them on every box or a bag. If you want organic, look for labels, read the fine print. Always read the fine print. And in the meantime? Read, learn, do your research. If you’re reading this, that means you’re already on the right track.  
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This is what the USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) has to say on the matter: “Organic is a labeling term that indicates that the food or other agricultural product has been produced through approved methods.  These methods integrate cultural, biological, and mechanical practices that foster cycling of resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity. Synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge, irradiation, and genetic engineering may not be used.” So, to put it simply, organic food is food that was grown without the use of pesticides or any other chemical that is not allowed. We’d also add that having a real organic farm requires certification. Organic farms have to follow strict rules and standards in order to get the organic certificate, so always check for those when buying organic food. Is organic food better than conventional foods? So this is the real question. Is organic food healthier, more nutritious, does it have better long-term effects on our bodies? If yes, why? If no, why not? So, let’s cross out each of those questions, one by one. Is organic food healthier? Since we now know the official definition of organic food, we know that those types of food are not treated with plenty of pesticides, or treated chemically.  According to research, being exposed to very high levels of pesticides and herbicides can lead to a higher risk of cancer. However, the amount of pesticides used in growing fruits, vegetables, or meat, are not nearly as high. Even more so, there seems to be no evidence that would show that long exposure to pesticides in food causes a higher risk of cancer. If you feel uneasy about farms using lots of pesticides and herbicides, then buying and eating organic food makes a lot more sense. Is organic food more nutritious than non organic food? According to all the research being done so far, there is no proof that organic food is more nutritious than conventional food. What this means is that, if you were to compare two apples - one organic, and the other non organic, they would have the same nutritional value. This, however, doesn’t make organic and non organic food the same. Organic food is not treated chemically, and is not exposed to pesticides or antibiotics (sometimes used with cattle) in the same manner conventional food is - so if you want to minimize your exposure to those things as well, organic food is the way to go for you. Is organic food better for the environment? As with all the previous questions, this one is also not that easy to give a straight yes or no question. While growing food on the farm takes up more space creating higher emissions, the overall treatment of soil is better than when it’s treated with chemicals. Organic systems used in organic farming use less energy, use less fertilizer and much less herbicid, have more fertile soil, and are also more profitable. The classification of organic food   According to USDA, there are 4 different organic labels: “100 Percent Organic” Used to label any product that contains 100 percent organic ingredients (excluding salt and water, which are considered natural) Most raw, unprocessed or minimally processed farm crops can be labeled “100 percent organic” PDP: May include USDA organic seal and/or 100 percent organic claim IP: Identify organic ingredients (e.g., organic dill) or via asterisk or other mark “Organic” Any product that contains a minimum of 95 percent organic ingredients (excluding salt and water) Up to 5 percent of ingredients may be nonorganic agricultural products and/or nonagricultural products on the National List (non organic agricultural products and several nonagricultural p roducts on the National List may only be used if they are not commercially available as organic) PDP: May include USDA organic seal and/or organic claim IP: Identify organic ingredients (e.g., organic dill) or via asterisk or other mark “Made with Organic ______” Product contains at least 70 percent organically produced ingredients (excluding salt and water), with a number of detailed constraints regarding ingredients that comprise the inorganic portion PDP: May state “made with organic (insert up to three ingredients or ingredient categories)”; must not include USDA organic seal anywhere, represent finished product as organic, or state “made with organic ingredients” IP: Identify organic ingredients (e.g., organic dill) or via asterisk or other mark Specific Organic Ingredient Listings Specific organic ingredients may be listed in the ingredient statement of products containing less than 70 percent organic contents—for example, “Ingredients: water, barley, beans, organic tomatoes, salt.” PDP: Must not include USDA organic seal anywhere or the word “organic” IP: May only list certified organic ingredients as organic in the ingredient list and the percentage of organic ingredients; remaining ingredients not required to follow the USDA organic regulations.” However, also keep in mind that: “Producers who market less than $5,000 worth of organic products annually are not required to apply for organic certification, with the following caveats: Must comply with the organic production and handling requirements of the regulations, including recordkeeping (for at least 3 years). Products from such noncertified operations cannot be used as organic ingredients in processed products produced by another operation nor may they display the USDA certified organic seal. “ So, next time you shop for organic products, keep in mind the label class, and decide what you feel comfortable with. The downside of organic food This seems to be one of the easiest ones to answer: the price. It seems like the price of organic food is a lot higher than conventional foods.  It may seem ok to you to pay more in order to incorporate ingredients that were less exposed to pesticides and chemicals, as well as non-GMO, in which case we say: go for it!  We’d also like to add that profit margins for organic farming are larger than for non-organic farming.  All we’re saying is that you should be careful, and know your facts. Educate yourself when reading about everything, and know who stands behind the information you're reading about; in the world of online information flowing around effortlessly, managed by AI, it can be easy to surround yourself with a stream of “facts” that confirm your pre-research thoughts.  This means that, oftentimes, you can find information both for organic farming (sometimes supported by organic farming companies) and against it (sometimes supported by conventional farming companies) - so it’s best to look for research done by independent researchers. Easy-to-follow organic and non-organic ingredients to buy If you don’t have enough money to go full organic, we’re here to help! There are certain foods that require more pesticides to grow, in which case you should consider getting those organic. Each year, the Environmental Working Group (EWG), a nonprofit organization, writes a Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce that lists fruits and vegetables with the highest and lowest pesticide residues. Buy organic: According to the “dirty dozen” list, these are the fruits and vegetables you should buy organic: Strawberries Spinach Kale, collard and mustard greens Nectarines Apples Grapes Cherries Peaches Pears Bell and hot Peppers Celery Tomatoes These fruits and vegetables are likely to be contaminated with pesticide residues. Don’t have to buy organic: EWG’s list of 15 clean foods lists these as foods you don’t have to buy organic: Avocados Sweet corn Pineapple Onions Papaya Sweet peas (frozen) Eggplant Asparagus Broccoli Cabbage Kiwi Cauliflower Mushrooms Honeydew melon Cantaloupe These fruits and vegetables are less likely to be contaminated with pesticide residues. Conclusion: Know your ingredients The best advice anyone can give you when shopping and wanting to eat healthy and clean is to KNOW YOUR INGREDIENTS.  We know it might be difficult or overwhelming to read and learn about all the different ingredients, additives, and nutritional values - but if you really want to know what you’re consuming….this might be the only way. Make yourself familiar with nutritional tables, and always look for them on every box or a bag. If you want organic, look for labels, read the fine print. Always read the fine print. And in the meantime? Read, learn, do your research. If you’re reading this, that means you’re already on the right track.  
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