Proper Sleeping Positions During Pregnancy - Simple Ways To A Better Rest

Proper Sleeping Positions During Pregnancy - Simple Ways To A Better Rest

For new parents, sleep deprivation is an unavoidable reality. However, for most of them, sleep problems begin before the kid is even born. Hormones fluctuate, bodily systems change, and stress levels rise. These can cause a slew of physiological changes that can disrupt sleep in unexpected ways throughout pregnancy. Almost all pregnant women have many nightly awakenings, with a considerable majority experiencing insomnia, poor sleep quality, and increased daytime weariness during all three trimesters.

Getting enough sleep is essential for both developing newborns and moms.

Sleep deprivation has been linked to longer, more painful labors, greater cesarean rates, and higher levels of inflammation throughout pregnancy.

But there is some good news as well. There are a variety of proper sleeping positions during pregnancy that can reduce sleep disruptions and obtain the rest you and your infant require.

Let’s start with the basics.

sleeping positions during pregnancy

Sleeping positions for pregnancy - what you need to know

A pregnant lady may find it challenging to find a comfortable sleeping posture as her unborn child becomes larger. Sleeping on one side with bent knees is often the most comfortable position for pregnant women, since it encourages good circulation.

This being said, here are some practices that can help you sleep on your side more comfortably:

  • Place a cushion between your legs or behind your baby bulge
  • To support your body, use additional cushions or a body pillow
  • To relieve stiff hips, use a foam or egg crate mattress pad
  • To reduce pressure, place a rolled blanket at the base of your spine

Don't be alarmed if you find yourself sleeping on your back. If you're prone to this posture, consider sleeping on your side with a wedge cushion behind you. If you roll back, you'll be tilted, which will decrease the effect of sleeping on your back.

better rest during pregnancy

Trimesters - explained

There are three stages of a pregnancy (trimesters):

  • the first trimester is from week 1 to the end of week 12
  • the second trimester is from week 13 to the end of week 26
  • the third trimester is from week 27 to the end of the pregnancy

Sleeping during pregnancy the first trimester

Early on, sleeping in any posture is usually fine.

You could be concerned that relaxing or stretching on your tummy would harm your baby. It turns out that resting on your stomach while pregnant will not harm your baby, but you may not be able to do so if you are farther along.

Sleeping position during pregnancy the second trimester

As your belly expands, ensure your mattress is firm enough that your back doesn't slump. If yours is too soft, try putting a board between the mattress and the box spring.

Pregnancy pillows may also be of interest to you. They're available in U or C configurations, and they wrap around your complete body to help you sleep on your side.

Sleeping during the third trimester

Continue to support yourself with a pregnant cushion. Investigate wedge pillows if you find them too burdensome with your developing tummy. To keep from rolling, place them behind your belly button and behind your back.

If you can't seem to get used to sleeping on your side, elevate your upper body at a 45-degree angle using pillows. You won't be flat on your back, and the compression on your IVC will be relieved.

Sleeping during the third trimester

Left vs. right side sleeping

During pregnancy, doctors usually recommend sleeping on your side. The reason behind this is related to blood flow. The risk of blood flow compression to the uterus increases as the fetus becomes larger.

Sleeping on your left side during pregnancy is generally referred to as the optimal situation. Blood flow from the inferior vena cava is improved when you position yourself on your left side of the body (IVC). Sleeping on your left side relieves strain on your liver and kidneys as well. This means you'll have more room to move about, which will assist with swelling in your hands, ankles, and feet. However, the researchers discovered no link between individuals who slept on their backs or in positions other than the left side.

But does this mean that you should avoid sleeping on the right side during pregnancy?

A 2019 study showed that sleeping on the left or right side is equally safe. When you sleep on your right, there's a tiny possibility of compression difficulties with the IVC, but it's primarily a question of personal preference.

Left vs. right side sleeping

Final thoughts

Your body restores and fixes itself when you sleep. It's how your blood vessels heal, which is especially crucial now because they're under greater strain from the extra blood flow needed to sustain your kid. So make sure you use our tips for a better sleep during pregnancy.

 


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For new parents, sleep deprivation is an unavoidable reality. However, for most of them, sleep problems begin before the kid is even born. Hormones fluctuate, bodily systems change, and stress levels rise. These can cause a slew of physiological changes that can disrupt sleep in unexpected ways throughout pregnancy. Almost all pregnant women have many nightly awakenings, with a considerable majority experiencing insomnia, poor sleep quality, and increased daytime weariness during all three trimesters. Getting enough sleep is essential for both developing newborns and moms. Sleep deprivation has been linked to longer, more painful labors, greater cesarean rates, and higher levels of inflammation throughout pregnancy. But there is some good news as well. There are a variety of proper sleeping positions during pregnancy that can reduce sleep disruptions and obtain the rest you and your infant require. Let’s start with the basics. Sleeping positions for pregnancy - what you need to know A pregnant lady may find it challenging to find a comfortable sleeping posture as her unborn child becomes larger. Sleeping on one side with bent knees is often the most comfortable position for pregnant women, since it encourages good circulation. This being said, here are some practices that can help you sleep on your side more comfortably: Place a cushion between your legs or behind your baby bulge To support your body, use additional cushions or a body pillow To relieve stiff hips, use a foam or egg crate mattress pad To reduce pressure, place a rolled blanket at the base of your spine Don't be alarmed if you find yourself sleeping on your back. If you're prone to this posture, consider sleeping on your side with a wedge cushion behind you. If you roll back, you'll be tilted, which will decrease the effect of sleeping on your back. Trimesters - explained There are three stages of a pregnancy (trimesters): the first trimester is from week 1 to the end of week 12 the second trimester is from week 13 to the end of week 26 the third trimester is from week 27 to the end of the pregnancy Sleeping during pregnancy the first trimester Early on, sleeping in any posture is usually fine. You could be concerned that relaxing or stretching on your tummy would harm your baby. It turns out that resting on your stomach while pregnant will not harm your baby, but you may not be able to do so if you are farther along. Sleeping position during pregnancy the second trimester As your belly expands, ensure your mattress is firm enough that your back doesn't slump. If yours is too soft, try putting a board between the mattress and the box spring. Pregnancy pillows may also be of interest to you. They're available in U or C configurations, and they wrap around your complete body to help you sleep on your side. Sleeping during the third trimester Continue to support yourself with a pregnant cushion. Investigate wedge pillows if you find them too burdensome with your developing tummy. To keep from rolling, place them behind your belly button and behind your back. If you can't seem to get used to sleeping on your side, elevate your upper body at a 45-degree angle using pillows. You won't be flat on your back, and the compression on your IVC will be relieved. Left vs. right side sleeping During pregnancy, doctors usually recommend sleeping on your side. The reason behind this is related to blood flow. The risk of blood flow compression to the uterus increases as the fetus becomes larger. Sleeping on your left side during pregnancy is generally referred to as the optimal situation. Blood flow from the inferior vena cava is improved when you position yourself on your left side of the body (IVC). Sleeping on your left side relieves strain on your liver and kidneys as well. This means you'll have more room to move about, which will assist with swelling in your hands, ankles, and feet. However, the researchers discovered no link between individuals who slept on their backs or in positions other than the left side. But does this mean that you should avoid sleeping on the right side during pregnancy? A 2019 study showed that sleeping on the left or right side is equally safe. When you sleep on your right, there's a tiny possibility of compression difficulties with the IVC, but it's primarily a question of personal preference. Final thoughts Your body restores and fixes itself when you sleep. It's how your blood vessels heal, which is especially crucial now because they're under greater strain from the extra blood flow needed to sustain your kid. So make sure you use our tips for a better sleep during pregnancy.  
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