What Are The Health Benefits Of Zinc

What Are The Health Benefits Of Zinc

Zinc is an essential nutrient that our body needs in order to function. However, our bodies can’t create zinc themselves, which means we need to ingest it, either through food or supplements. What are the health benefits of zinc? Read more to find out what zinc does for the human body and why we need zinc.

What is Zinc? 

Zinc is an essential trace element for humans, animals, plants, and microorganisms. A trace element, also called a minor element, is a chemical element whose concentration is very low. They are classified into two groups: essential and non-essential. Essential trace elements are needed for many physiological and biochemical processes in both plants and animals - the very reason we need zinc for.

Zinc is required for the function of over 300 enzymes (proteins that act as catalysts and accelerate chemical reactions) and has roles in the metabolism of RNA and DNA.

How does zinc help your body

As mentioned earlier, zinc seems to play a role in many functions of the human body. Let’s learn more about what zinc does for you and what are the health benefits of zinc.

Accelerates wound healing

Skin is the third most zinc-abundant tissue in the body (first is skeletal muscle with 60%, then bones with 30%, and liver and skin at 5%). Zinc helps heal and rejuvenate skin. In the human body, zinc is maintained in a weight of about 2–3 grams.

What amount of zinc is recommended for wound healing? If you cut your skin, experts recommend administering up to 50 mg of elemental zinc per day until epithelialization is well-established or until the wound is fully closed. In zinc-deficient individuals, 3 months of supplementation with 25 mg to 50 mg daily of elemental zinc can have a positive effect on wound-healing.

Can help reduce inflammation

Research suggests that zinc is a potent anti-inflammatory that may reduce several markers for inflammation. Another reason why zinc is good for you is because it decreases oxidative stress among older adults, thus reducing levels of certain inflammatory proteins in your body. Oxidative stress can lead to chronic inflammation, a contributing factor in a wide array of chronic illnesses. 

May help with acne treatment

An interesting info about zinc is that its use has expanded over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections, inflammatory dermatoses, pigmentary disorders, and neoplasias. Studies show that zinc can decrease oil production in the skin, and can protect it against bacterial infection and inflammation.

While topical 5% zinc sulphate can be effective in mild to moderate acne, oral zinc sulphate and zinc gluconate can be useful in moderate to severe acne. 100 mg of oral zinc sulphate and 90 mg/day of oral zinc gluconate can show significant clinical improvement. 

Keep in mind that it can take up to three months of topical application before you see visible results. If you don’t notice any changes after this period, it is best to talk to your doctor about your condition.

Immunity boost

Zinc has become a popular means of prevention against the common cold. Research suggests that zinc is a potent anti-inflammatory that may support the immune system.

Meant to boost your immune system, zinc is usually added to supplements and other healthcare products. The mineral is needed for immune cell development and communication, playing an important role in inflammatory response. Zinc also specifically protects tissue barriers in the body and helps prevent foreign pathogens from entering.        

The risks of zinc deficiency

A deficiency in this nutrient significantly affects your immune system’s ability to function properly. This can lead to an increased risk of infection or disease.

Symptoms of zinc deficiency

Symptoms of mild zinc deficiency include diarrhea, decreased immunity, thinning hair, decreased appetite, mood disturbances, dry skin, fertility issues, and impaired wound healing. Symptoms of severe zinc deficiency include impaired growth and development, delayed sexual maturity, skin rashes, chronic diarrhea, impaired wound healing, and even behavioral issues.

People with zinc deficiencies are more likely to have arthritis. This suggests a link between zinc deficiency, inflammation, and pain.

Who’s at risk?

Milder forms of zinc deficiency are more common, especially in children in developing countries where diets are often lacking important nutrients. Other categories at risk of zinc deficiency include people with gastrointestinal diseases, vegetarians and vegans, pregnant and breastfeeding women, individuals who suffer from anemia, people who are malnourished, those with kidney problems, and those who abuse alcohol.

Foods that contain zinc

There are certain foods that have a high concentration of zinc. Meat, milk products, legumes, seeds, nuts, and oysters are all sources that contain substantial amounts of zinc.

Benefits of zinc supplements

As previously mentioned, zinc metabolizes nutrients, supports your immune system, and helps with cell growth and repair. Supplements based on zinc are carefully formulated to ensure the recommended daily intake. Moreover, zinc supplements that come in liquid form are optimized for faster and better absorption of the nutrients. It is best to take zinc supplements with food to avoid irritating your stomach.

Recommended dietary allowances 

Intake recommendations for zinc and other nutrients are provided in the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) developed by the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) at the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies (formerly National Academy of Sciences). DRI is the general term for a set of reference values used for planning and assessing nutrient intakes of healthy people. These values, which vary by age and gender, include the following:

  • Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA): Average daily level of intake sufficient to meet the nutrient requirements of nearly all (97%–98%) healthy individuals; often used to plan nutritionally adequate diets for individuals.
  • Adequate Intake (AI): Intake at this level is assumed to ensure nutritional adequacy; established when evidence is insufficient to develop an RDA.
  • Estimated Average Requirement (EAR): Average daily level of intake estimated to meet the requirements of 50% of healthy individuals; usually used to assess the nutrient intakes of groups of people and to plan nutritionally adequate diets for them; can also be used to assess the nutrient intakes of individuals.
  • Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL): Maximum daily intake unlikely to cause adverse health effects. 

Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for zinc:

Age

Male

Female

Pregnancy

Lactation

0-6 months

2 mg

2 mg

 

 

7-12 months

3 mg

3 mg

 

 

1-3 years

3 mg

3 mg

 

 

4-8 years

5 mg

5 mg

 

 

9-13

8 mg

8 mg

 

 

14-18 years

11 mg

9 mg

12 mg

13 mg

19+ years

11 mg

8 mg

11 mg

12 mg

 

Fun facts about zinc

Let’s end this “lesson” with some zinc-related facts and stats that may surprise you:

  • According to research, 16% of all deep respiratory infections worldwide have been found to be due to zinc deficiency.

 

 

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Zinc is an essential element found in our bodies. It may help us function properly, as we can focus better on our tasks and learn easier. It may also boost our well-being!

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Zinc is an essential element found in our bodies. It may help us function properly, as we can focus better on our tasks and learn easier. It may also boost our well-being!


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Zinc is an essential nutrient that our body needs in order to function. However, our bodies can’t create zinc themselves, which means we need to ingest it, either through food or supplements. What are the health benefits of zinc? Read more to find out what zinc does for the human body and why we need zinc. What is Zinc?  Zinc is an essential trace element for humans, animals, plants, and microorganisms. A trace element, also called a minor element, is a chemical element whose concentration is very low. They are classified into two groups: essential and non-essential. Essential trace elements are needed for many physiological and biochemical processes in both plants and animals - the very reason we need zinc for. Zinc is required for the function of over 300 enzymes (proteins that act as catalysts and accelerate chemical reactions) and has roles in the metabolism of RNA and DNA. 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Another reason why zinc is good for you is because it decreases oxidative stress among older adults, thus reducing levels of certain inflammatory proteins in your body. Oxidative stress can lead to chronic inflammation, a contributing factor in a wide array of chronic illnesses.  May help with acne treatment An interesting info about zinc is that its use has expanded over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections, inflammatory dermatoses, pigmentary disorders, and neoplasias. Studies show that zinc can decrease oil production in the skin, and can protect it against bacterial infection and inflammation. While topical 5% zinc sulphate can be effective in mild to moderate acne, oral zinc sulphate and zinc gluconate can be useful in moderate to severe acne. 100 mg of oral zinc sulphate and 90 mg/day of oral zinc gluconate can show significant clinical improvement.  Keep in mind that it can take up to three months of topical application before you see visible results. If you don’t notice any changes after this period, it is best to talk to your doctor about your condition. Immunity boost Zinc has become a popular means of prevention against the common cold. Research suggests that zinc is a potent anti-inflammatory that may support the immune system. Meant to boost your immune system, zinc is usually added to supplements and other healthcare products. The mineral is needed for immune cell development and communication, playing an important role in inflammatory response. 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Zinc also specifically protects tissue barriers in the body and helps prevent foreign pathogens from entering.         The risks of zinc deficiency A deficiency in this nutrient significantly affects your immune system’s ability to function properly. This can lead to an increased risk of infection or disease. Symptoms of zinc deficiency Symptoms of mild zinc deficiency include diarrhea, decreased immunity, thinning hair, decreased appetite, mood disturbances, dry skin, fertility issues, and impaired wound healing. Symptoms of severe zinc deficiency include impaired growth and development, delayed sexual maturity, skin rashes, chronic diarrhea, impaired wound healing, and even behavioral issues. People with zinc deficiencies are more likely to have arthritis. This suggests a link between zinc deficiency, inflammation, and pain. Who’s at risk? 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Another reason why zinc is good for you is because it decreases oxidative stress among older adults, thus reducing levels of certain inflammatory proteins in your body. Oxidative stress can lead to chronic inflammation, a contributing factor in a wide array of chronic illnesses.  May help with acne treatment An interesting info about zinc is that its use has expanded over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections, inflammatory dermatoses, pigmentary disorders, and neoplasias. Studies show that zinc can decrease oil production in the skin, and can protect it against bacterial infection and inflammation. While topical 5% zinc sulphate can be effective in mild to moderate acne, oral zinc sulphate and zinc gluconate can be useful in moderate to severe acne. 100 mg of oral zinc sulphate and 90 mg/day of oral zinc gluconate can show significant clinical improvement.  Keep in mind that it can take up to three months of topical application before you see visible results. If you don’t notice any changes after this period, it is best to talk to your doctor about your condition. Immunity boost Zinc has become a popular means of prevention against the common cold. Research suggests that zinc is a potent anti-inflammatory that may support the immune system. Meant to boost your immune system, zinc is usually added to supplements and other healthcare products. The mineral is needed for immune cell development and communication, playing an important role in inflammatory response. Zinc also specifically protects tissue barriers in the body and helps prevent foreign pathogens from entering.         The risks of zinc deficiency A deficiency in this nutrient significantly affects your immune system’s ability to function properly. This can lead to an increased risk of infection or disease. Symptoms of zinc deficiency Symptoms of mild zinc deficiency include diarrhea, decreased immunity, thinning hair, decreased appetite, mood disturbances, dry skin, fertility issues, and impaired wound healing. Symptoms of severe zinc deficiency include impaired growth and development, delayed sexual maturity, skin rashes, chronic diarrhea, impaired wound healing, and even behavioral issues. People with zinc deficiencies are more likely to have arthritis. This suggests a link between zinc deficiency, inflammation, and pain. Who’s at risk? Milder forms of zinc deficiency are more common, especially in children in developing countries where diets are often lacking important nutrients. Other categories at risk of zinc deficiency include people with gastrointestinal diseases, vegetarians and vegans, pregnant and breastfeeding women, individuals who suffer from anemia, people who are malnourished, those with kidney problems, and those who abuse alcohol. Foods that contain zinc There are certain foods that have a high concentration of zinc. Meat, milk products, legumes, seeds, nuts, and oysters are all sources that contain substantial amounts of zinc. Benefits of zinc supplements As previously mentioned, zinc metabolizes nutrients, supports your immune system, and helps with cell growth and repair. Supplements based on zinc are carefully formulated to ensure the recommended daily intake. Moreover, zinc supplements that come in liquid form are optimized for faster and better absorption of the nutrients. It is best to take zinc supplements with food to avoid irritating your stomach. Recommended dietary allowances  Intake recommendations for zinc and other nutrients are provided in the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) developed by the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) at the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies (formerly National Academy of Sciences). DRI is the general term for a set of reference values used for planning and assessing nutrient intakes of healthy people. These values, which vary by age and gender, include the following: Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA): Average daily level of intake sufficient to meet the nutrient requirements of nearly all (97%–98%) healthy individuals; often used to plan nutritionally adequate diets for individuals. Adequate Intake (AI): Intake at this level is assumed to ensure nutritional adequacy; established when evidence is insufficient to develop an RDA. 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Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL): Maximum daily intake unlikely to cause adverse health effects.  Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for zinc: Age Male Female Pregnancy Lactation 0-6 months 2 mg 2 mg     7-12 months 3 mg 3 mg     1-3 years 3 mg 3 mg     4-8 years 5 mg 5 mg     9-13 8 mg 8 mg     14-18 years 11 mg 9 mg 12 mg 13 mg 19+ years 11 mg 8 mg 11 mg 12 mg   Fun facts about zinc Let’s end this “lesson” with some zinc-related facts and stats that may surprise you: It is estimated that around 2 billion people worldwide are deficient in zinc due to inadequate dietary intake.  Zinc was known to be essential for the growth of plants and animals, but its role in human health was not known until 1963. According to research, 16% of all deep respiratory infections worldwide have been found to be due to zinc deficiency. Supplementing with zinc may also help reduce the duration of the common cold.     [code][product-handle]ionic-zinc[/product-handle][/code]
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